A5a The Grievance Procedure

A5a   THE GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE                                            

A grievance procedure is an internal procedure for use of the members and employees of the Association of Jungian Analysts (AJA). Its purpose is to provide a structure and process in which grievances can be resolved:

(a)      as quickly as possible;

(b)      near their point of origin.

The grievance procedure differs from the complaints procedure in that it does not deal with therapists’ conduct in relation to violations of AJA’s Code of Ethics.

Grievances may arise from conflicts and disputes between:

  • Members of AJA (including Candidates)
  • Member(s) and employee(s) of AJA
  • Members or employees of AJA (including candidates) and the organisation.

Grievances, as opposed to complaints, are concerned with the purpose and function of AJA as an organisation and the treatment and conduct of its members as set out in the constitution, the rules governing the training and the referrals of patients, contracts of employment as well as what can be considered fair and reasonable behaviour between all members and employees of the organisation.

A grievance procedure can have two stages: one, the informal stage and two, the formal stage. It is recommended that both parties seek support from a trusted person to maintain confidentiality within the Association throughout the whole procedure.

Timings – The time-table for each section in this document is detailed, with the exception of holiday periods (working days are Mon-Fri):

  1. Christmas (ten working days)
  2. Easter (ten working days)
  3. All public holidays in England and Wales
  4. The calendar months of July and August

1. The informal stage

The informal stage of the procedure consists of the following:

i) A member or employee puts a grievance in writing to the Chair of the Association.

 From the date of receipt of the grievance:

ii) The person(s) against whom the grievance is being brought receive(s) a copy of the grievance (normally within one week).

iii)  The Chair will, together with another member of Council, consider the grievance (normally within three weeks). If there is a boundary issue for the Chair, then the Chair will appoint a representative.

iv) The two people appointed will share their views with the aggrieved party and may suggest that the matter may be resolved by the way of conciliation (normally within four weeks).

v) If this is acceptable to the person bringing the grievance and to the person against whom it is brought, another meeting will be held to work out a solution acceptable to both parties (normally within six weeks).

vi) If conciliation is not possible, then the grievance procedure will go on to the formal stage.

2. The formal stage

The formal stage of the grievance procedure requires the formation of a panel to investigate the grievance, adjudicate whether or not the grievance is justified and what should happen as a result. The Chair of the Association, or their representative (see above), will convene the panel. The formation of the panel should be completed within three weeks of the failed informal stage.

The panel should consist of three people:

  • A member of AJA’s Council (who should have no connection with any party involved in the grievance ie analyst, supervisor, training committee member, line manager)
  • Two professional members of AJA (who should have no connection with any party involve in the grievance ie analyst, supervisor, training committee member, line manager)       

The Chair of the Association or their representative (see above), will set a date for the meeting within 4 weeks of the formation of the panel and ensure that all relevant documentation is circulated to the panel members two weeks prior to the meeting.

3. The meeting

The panel will meet to investigate the grievance, adjudicate whether or not the grievance is justified and what should happen as a result. They will report back to the Chair of the Association in writing. 

4. Outcome

The Chair of the Association will convey the outcome of the panel to the parties concerned. 

5. Appeal

If either party wishes to appeal against the decision they must submit their reasons to the Chair of the Association within two weeks of receiving the outcome.

The Chair of the Association will appoint one or two external adjudicators to review all the documentation. The external adjudicator(s) will report to the appellant and to the Chair of the Association within six weeks of appointment.

If the grievance concerns any aspect of the training programme it would be advisable that the external person is familiar with the analytic training process. If the grievance concerns organisational matters then a lay person with some experience of the aspect under review could be approached.

6. Decision

The decision made at appeal is final and binding.

 

June 2019

 

 

 

 

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