C The Jungian Analytic Training for Qualified Psychotherapists (JATQP)

SECTION C

The Jungian Analytic Training for Qualified Psychotherapists (JATQP)

 

CONTENTS

C1   Application and selection……………………………………… page 73

C2   Practical aspects of the training programme………………….page 75

C3   Review process………………………………………………… page 77

C4   Review process guidelines ………………………………….…page 80

C4a Guidelines for writing the annual self-review…………………page 81

C4b Guidelines for Six Monthly Reports……………………………page 82

C5   Procedure for conducting the review process………………..page 83

C6   Guidelines for the final paper and review panel………………page 85

C7   Access to the clinical paper archive……………………………page 88

C8   Clinical experience and psychiatric placement……………….page 89

C9   Training loans…………………………………………………….page 90

C10 Access to candidate’s files………………………………….…..page 91

C11 Appeals procedure relating to candidates…………………….page 92

 

C1 APPLICATION AND SELECTION

1 Application

The training committee, in consultation with Council, will determine when the next training of candidates will commence. This will normally begin in January. The training committee will determine the closing dates for applicants.

Applicants should request a current prospectus of the JATQP and an application form.

Formal application should be made to the Association of Jungian Analysts, who will ensure receipt of the application is acknowledged.

There will be an application fee as determined by Council.

2 The Selection Group

The selection group is made up of the two analysts who interview each candidate, along with, normally, the chair of the training committee.

3 Selection Process

3.1 The training committee will discuss all applicants to determine whether the minimum requirements for training have been met. Members of the training committee are selected as the co-ordinators for individual applicants and to manage the application process. The administrator will request two references per applicant at this time.

3.2 The administrator notifies the applicant if they have met the minimum requirements. If so, they will be offered two interviews and are given the names, addresses and telephone numbers of their interviewers, one of whom will be a member of the training committee the other a professional member. They are advised that they will pay each interviewer the fee set for interviews.

3.3 The administrator will provide each interviewer with a copy of the applicant’s application form and the guidelines for the interview.

3.4 Interviewers will send written reports to the co-ordinator.

3.5 The selection group will meet to consider the written reports and consider references, and will make decisions regarding each applicant.

3.6 Applicants are selected for training, or not accepted, or not accepted but encouraged to apply again. The committee may detail additional requirements to be met before a re-application.

3.7 Those accepted will be sent a formal letter offering a place on the training and asking the applicant to confirm acceptance of selection. The letter will include further information about the beginning of training, the fee arrangements, and notification of the pre-training interview. A copy of the AJA handbook and a list of candidates will be given to all applicants after they have confirmed acceptance.

4 Pre-Training interview

4.1 This will be carried out by the training committee member who interviewed the applicant.

4.2 The interviewer will discuss with the candidate any special conditions or requirements before training and provide an opportunity for the candidate to ask questions and discuss any outstanding issues. Discussion will include attendance at monthly meetings, summer school and other training events as a requirement by the training committee. Candidates are normally expected to see two training patients.  The requirements of personal analysis throughout the training will also be discussed.

4.3 The candidate will be notified of the procedure for choosing a tutor and supervisor at this interview.

4.4 The fee for this interview will be met by AJA

 

C2 PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF THE TRAINING PROGRAMME

This is a guide to practical aspects of the course, please read in conjunction with sections C3 C6.

  1. Attendance

The modular seminar programme lasts for two years, followed by attendance at ongoing monthly clinical seminars until qualification.  Personal analysis at a minimum of three times a week is required for the duration of the training. Regular attendance at seminars and monthly meetings is required. If you are unable to attend, please let the seminar leader know. Monthly meetings on the first Tuesday in the month are part of your course. Attendance is a requirement.

  1. Review Panel

Your progress is monitored by a panel of two members of AJA in discussion with you (see sections C3, C4 and C5).

  1. Training Patients

You normally are expected to see two training patients three times weekly during training.  There should be one male patient and one female patient. A first case is seen for a minimum of two years; a second, for a minimum of eighteen months. They are supervised weekly, individually, with an AJA supervisor for a minimum total of 140 hours. The analytic sessions are to be in person, not using skype or email, and on three separate days of the week. There is one supervisor for each training patient, one male and one female.

You find your own training patients either from your private practice or the AJA low cost scheme or by direct referral. A potential training patient is initially discussed with your supervisor. If deemed to be possible, the patient would (normally) if new to your practice be assessed by a senior member of AJA as to their suitability. This interview is organized in conjunction with the training committee and the cost of this interview is included in the training fees.  Patients are asked to make a commitment for the necessary length of time. If not new to your practice then different guidelines are followed (See Item 4, Guidelines for the assessment of potential training patients)

 

  1. Guidelines for the assessment of potential training patients

i) When a candidate has a new potential training patient, the candidate does an initial assessment with the potential patient. That session is written up and then discussed in detail with the supervisor, who decides whether the person might be a training patient. The potential patient then goes to see one of the assessors who will recommend whether they are indeed suitable. There is no charge to the patient for this interview. This is paid for internally. Some notes on that assessment will be made available to the supervisor and the candidate. The assessor will talk with the supervisor and the two of them together will make a recommendation as to the suitability of the prospective training patient.

ii) When an existing patient in a candidate’s private practice is identified as a possible training patient, the candidate discusses the situation with the supervisor. A minimum of three supervision sessions are then spent discussing the patient and the work that has taken place thus far. If the supervisor agrees that the patient could be a viable training patient this is then discussed in a phone call with one of the assessing supervisors. A short report on this, written by the latter, is then placed in the candidate’s training file.

 

5.Ethics

When a candidate begins three times weekly work with a training patient (either from their own practice or takes on a new patient) the patient must be informed that the work will take place under the BPC Code of Ethics. Candidates should acquaint themselves with the BPC Code of Ethics before starting work with a training patient.

  1. Supervision

Supervision continues weekly through training until final qualification.

Each supervisor will write a report for every review, which having first been seen by the candidate, will then be sent by the supervisor to the review panel and to the candidate’s other supervisor

When all clinical requirements have been completed, all relevant paperwork submitted and you have had a successful final review panel, supervision of one of your training patients may end. Normally this would be the supervision of your second training patient, so that you remain with the supervisor of your first training patient while you write your final paper. You should first get the written agreement of both your supervisors to this course of action and send these to your review panel. The review panel will then make a recommendation to the Training Committee who will make the final decision.  You will be notified of the outcome by the chair of the committee.
Any difficulties arising should be referred to the training committee

 

  1. 7. Tutor

You choose your individual tutor from the tutor list in conjunction with the training committee. Consideration is given to balancing the workload amongst the tutors so that no one tutor has more than two candidates. Consideration is also given to the gender balance of those who are closely involved with the candidate.

You meet with them at least once a term. A tutor usually stays with you throughout training. The tutor may not be your supervisor or analyst.  Their functions are to offer academic support and to build a good relationship with you, so you feel free to discuss matters concerning you about training.

Questions, views and queries about any aspect of the organisation of training are welcomed as we review these continuously. This can relate to the organisation, syllabus, seminar leaders, difficulties around attendance, or any other matters.

Tutorials are confidential unless you specifically ask your tutor to give feedback to the training committee.

The fee for a tutorial is met by the candidate.                                 November 2016

 

C3 REVIEW PROCESS

This procedure is to be read in conjunction with the following documents:

C4 Review Process Guidelines

C5 Review Process Procedure

Each candidate will have a review panel comprised of two members of AJA, one who will be a member of the training committee and one a professional member. We will do our best to ensure the membership of your review panel remains the same but there may be circumstances in which it will have to be changed.

 

  1. Six-monthly Reports

You will write a separate report every six months on each individual training patient. These reports form a core component of the review process. The six-monthly reports are discussed on a regular basis in the clinical seminars. In practice draft versions are circulated in advance to the clinical seminar leader and fellow candidates. After the seminar final versions of the reports are sent to the office, your supervisor(s) and members of your review panel.

  1. Annual Review Panels

2.1 First Review Panel

After one year of training you will meet with your review panel. You will write a self review for discussion with members of the panel. Six-monthly reports will be considered in conjunction with reports from seminar leaders and your supervisor(s).

The aim of the meeting will be to engage in a discussion in order to explore your experience of training. The first part of the meeting will focus on aspects of clinical work with your training patient which you have found significant and challenging. In the event of you not yet having started or completed six months with your training patient, the meeting will be based on a discussion, from a Jungian perspective, of clinical work from your practice.

The second part of the meeting will be an opportunity to participate in a dialogue, led by you, on aspects of Jung’s Collected Works which particularly engaged you over the year. You will be asked to inform the panel of your topic for discussion prior to the review meeting.

Finally, the panel meets separately to recommend one of three options to the training committee:

  1. a) to proceed;
  2. b) to wait longer (possibly with a requirement, e.g. amend a six monthly report);
  3. c) the advisability of continuing training may be discussed.

You and your supervisor(s) will receive a copy of the review panel report. You will be

asked to sign it and you may add any comments you wish to make.

2.2 Second Review Panel

Towards the end of the second year of training you will meet the review panel again to review your progress before continuing onto the next stage of the training. Your self-review, supervisor(s) report(s), seminar leaders’ reports, and six-monthly reports will form the basis of the first part of the discussion, and the focus of discussion will again be on aspects of clinical work with your training patient(s) which you have found significant and challenging.

The second part of the meeting will centre on a dialogue, led by you, on one or more topics related to post-Jungian thinking which have particularly interested you. You will be asked to inform the panel of your topic in advance, and these will serve as a basis for dialogue between yourself and your reviewers.

The panel will recommend to the Training Committee whether you are ready to continue. You and your supervisor(s) will receive a copy of the review panel report. You will be asked to sign it and you may add any comments you wish to make.

2.3 Further Annual Review Panels

Annual review panels will continue until the candidate has completed all the clinical supervision requirements and all the six monthly reports have been submitted. At this point the candidate requests a review panel to assess their readiness to write the final paper.

Your self-review, supervisor(s) report(s), seminar leaders’ reports, and six-monthly reports will form the basis of the first part of the discussion, and the focus of discussion will again be on aspects of clinical work with your training patient(s) which you have found significant and challenging.

The second part of the meeting will once again centre on a dialogue, led by you, on one or more topics related to post-Jungian thinking which have particularly interested you. You will be asked to inform the panel of your topic in advance, and these will serve as a basis for dialogue between yourself and your reviewers.

The panel will recommend to the Training Committee whether you are ready to write your final paper. You and your supervisor(s) will receive a copy of the review panel report. You will be asked to sign it and you may add any comments you wish to make.

  1. Final Paper

To be read in conjunction with C6

The final paper, of 8,000 -12,000 words, will be based on your clinical case and will incorporate your understanding of Jungian and post-Jungian theory as it relates to the case. You will discuss the final paper with the review panel and an external reviewer which, together with the reports and discussions summarised above, will form the basis of the review leading to qualification.

Summary of written material required:

  1. a) Six monthly Reports on each training patient until qualifying.
  2. b) Annual self-reviews.
  3. c) Final paper for qualification.
  4. 4. Qualification

The final paper review panel will report to the training committee with their recommendation. The training committee will vote on your readiness to qualify. If the training committee considers you ready to qualify it will recommend to Council that you be offered membership of AJA. Following a vote you will be informed of the outcome by the chair of AJA.  You will then be asked to read the paper to an AJA monthly meeting.

AJA reserves the right to discontinue your training at any time.

 

C4 REVIEW PROCESS GUIDELINES

Guidelines describing areas for discussion relating to the self-review (see C4a), six-monthly reports (see C4b), seminar and supervisor(s) reports.

The frame of the analysis

How in the analytic process we establish and maintain boundaries, begin a

therapeutic relationship, and how (when appropriate) the end of the relationship is managed.

Empathy, containment and tolerance

Discussion on the capacity to respond to the subjective state of the patient; the ability to listen, to tolerate strong feelings and not knowing, and to make interventions in a form which can be heard and made sense of by the patient.

Transference and counter-transference

Discussion of the nature of the patient’s transference, and, in light of this, how we deal with resistance and defences, and how we make therapeutic use of countertransference experiences.

Work with the symbolic

Exploration of how we are able to make use of different forms of symbolic communication, e.g. the patient’s conscious and unconscious fantasies, dreams, non-verbal communication, etc.; and how we might understand the patient’s psychopathology from an archetypal and developmental perspective.

Theory

How we make use of theory to underpin the clinical work, and the use made of clinical evidence to arrive at conceptually coherent conclusions.

Towards the next stage

The candidate may be asked to explore learning needs relating to their advance into the next period of training.

Work in supervision

The candidate may wish to comment on the relationship and work with their

supervisor(s).

 

 C4a Guidelines for writing the annual self-review

The aim of writing annual self-reviews is for you to reflect on your training process thus far, as you make the transition towards becoming a Jungian analyst. How has the training experience impacted on you, not only in terms of your difficulties and struggles but also your achievements and successes? How have you changed?

What has been your experience in general of the seminars, the experiential group and of learning alongside your colleagues?

While the six-monthly reports have the training patient(s) as their focus, the self-review is an opportunity for you to focus on your own thinking, feelings and emotions, (rather than the patients’).

The self-review can be as little as 1000 but no more than 2,500 words. It needs to be double-spaced.

Areas in your clinical work, their impact and how you engage with them will need elaboration in preparation for discussion at the review meeting. e.g.

  • The frame of the clinical work
  • Empathy, containment and tolerance
  • Transference and counter-transference
  • Work with the symbolic
  • Theory
  • Towards the next stage in the training
  • Work in supervision

 

For a fuller explication see section C4 The Review Process Guidelines in the handbook.

As there might not be any six-monthly reports written by the time of your first review meeting you will need to include reflections in relation to your current private clinical work. Subsequent self-reviews will need to be written in relation to the impact on you of ongoing work with your training patient(s).

The self-review is discussed with your supervisor(s) and then emailed to the training administrator for distribution to the review panel and placed into your training file. Hard copies signed by you and your supervisor(s) are brought to the review meeting.

October 2015

 

C4b Guidelines for Six Monthly Reports

(Section C3, 1) ‘You will write a separate six monthly report on each individual training patient. There reports form a core component of the review process. The six monthly reports are discussed on a regular basis in the clinical seminars.’

The aim of these reports is to help you focus on the development of the analytic relationship, and provide a basis for your final reading in paper. Please do them promptly every six months on each training patient.

 

Layout

Double spaced, A4, wide margins, page number top right. Include word count.

 

Length

‘Less is more’ – no more than 2000 words (apart from the first one which needs to be longer and up to 2500 words).

 

Confidentiality                                                                    

Use initials or a pseudonym for the patient and respect the confidentiality of the patient, yourself and your supervisor in what you write.

 

Form and content

In the first report, include a brief history – family, early relationships, education, employment, and presenting problems. Add to this as time goes on. In subsequent reports include further history, progress in the analysis, significant interpretations and dreams, and how they were received and used. At some point, if you wish, try writing a formulation – a diagnostic tool and a hypothesis about the course of the analysis.

A formulation includes a brief account of the presenting problems; developmental origins and archetypal dilemmas; ideas about any complexes present; significant dreams or active imaginations; evolving transferences and counter transferences; any ethical and boundary problems.

If you wish, say which pieces of Jungian theory have been useful. Mention what has gone wrong as well as what has worked. This helps you deal with your own anxiety. Remember, there is no such thing as a ‘mistake’: these are usually, but not always, expressions of some unconscious complex which may need to be enacted before it can be symbolised.

 

Distribution of reports

Prior to presenting your patient to the clinical seminar send draft copies of each report to  the current clinical seminar leader  and  to the other candidates.

Once presented and discussed/amended send the final copy to go into your training file to the training administrator within two weeks. She will then send copies to your supervisor(s), your tutor and members of your review panel.

November 2016

 

C5 PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING THE REVIEW PROCESS

This procedure should be read in conjunction with the following documents:

C3 The Review Process

C4 Review Process Guidelines

5.1 Rationale

The review panel meeting provides you with an opportunity to engage in a professionally-toned dialogue concerning theoretical and clinical issues arising in the training.

5.2 Objectives of the Review Panel

The panel addresses areas as required and aims to:

-ensure you can expand on key themes of your analytic work and substantiate your understanding where required;

-ascertain your ability to engage professionally and reflectively in clinical and theoretical discussion;

-give you an opportunity to demonstrate a capacity for clinical and theoretical reflection beyond that which you may have shown in your written submissions;

-elucidate any unclear clinical and/or theoretical aspects of your written work or oral presentation;

-take up significant aspects relevant to the case work or themes that appear to have been omitted or have received insufficient attention.

5.3 Structure of the interview

Pre-interview discussion: 15 minutes. The panel meets to plan the interview.

The Interview

First part, 45 minutes:

You and the panel explore issues relating to the self-review, six-monthly reports, supervisor and seminar leaders’ reports as outlined in the “Guidelines describing areas for discussion” (C4).

A short break.

Second part, 30 minutes:

You and the panel discuss a topic chosen by yourself. This discussion will continue for thirty minutes after which time you will leave.

Post interview discussion: 30 minutes. The panel meet to discuss the interview and prepare a written report, agreed to by both its members, for submission to the training committee. The report will include a summary of the pre- and post-interview discussion, and will reflect the views of the panel and their recommendation comprising of one of three options:

  1. a) to proceed with the training process;
  2. b) to wait, the meaning of which will be outlined in a letter;
  3. c) the advisability of continuing the training may be discussed.

The panel is not authorised to inform you of any recommendation following the interview as this is the responsibility of the training committee.

 

5.4 The Training Committee

The committee will meet to discuss the report and recommendations of the review panel, and decide by vote whether you are ready to proceed into the next period of training. You will be informed by letter of this outcome and any observations the committee may wish to make. A copy of the review panel’s report will be included.

 

C6 GUIDELINES FOR THE FINAL PAPER AND REVIEW PANEL

6.1 Writing the Paper

When you have completed the clinical and written requirements of the training, attended the final annual review, and have been assessed as ready, you will be asked to write your final paper. The focus of this paper will normally be the training patient seen for at least two years. The paper should be a minimum of 8,000 words and a maximum of 12,000 words. Any paper outside these limits will be returned.

6.2 Rationale

You are encouraged to be creative in writing this paper. To become a Jungian analyst you need to be able to reflect on the clinical material coherently and constructively in the light of continually evolving post – Jungian theory. You need to be able to draw together your understanding of the various strands of Jungian theory (developmental, classical and archetypal) and to be evolving your personal stance. You need to show you are aware of the provisional and contradictory nature of theory and that you have criteria for selecting one theoretical approach rather than another. In the final paper you need to demonstrate the above abilities.

6.3 Objectives

You are asked to conceptualise some of the key themes arising from the clinical material. These may be themes which have caught your interest or imagination and which might lead to an exploration of new ground that has not been covered in the training. The themes chosen need to be of central importance in understanding the case.

To give a picture of how you work, you are asked to discuss the interaction between you and the patient, which includes verbatim vignettes of the sessions; to show you are using theory appropriately to illuminate your practice; to show how you work with the imaginal, and with collective as well as personal unconscious material.

You need to show you can express and sustain an argued point of view at a level of clarity appropriate for a Jungian analyst. You may wish to point to the ways in which the theoretical formulations of the clinical material conflict, and to give a rationale for

selecting a particular perspective.

6.4 Layout

The paper should be typed double-spaced on A4 paper, one side only with wide margins and appropriately bound. There should be a contents page. The number of words, not including the bibliography, should be stated on the front page. References should be given within the text and in the bibliography.

Bibliography references should be alphabetically listed and presented as follows: author(s) name(s), initials, (date of paper or book): title of paper or book/ name of journal + volume numbers + page numbers; book’s place of publication and publisher. In-text references to author(s) should consist of name, date, and where quotations are used, page reference. Please refer to the layout of articles published in the Journal of Analytical Psychology as a model.

6.5 Submission

You should notify the chair of your review panel when you would like to submit the paper, after which dates for submission and the review will be agreed. A copy of the paper, and current or most recent six-monthly report(s) should be posted individually to each member of the training committee, review panel, the external assessor, and your supervisor. The chair of the review panel will write to your supervisor to confirm the paper is a reflection of the work supervised. The chair of the review panel will provide details and postal addresses.

6.6 Review Panel Evaluation

When reading the paper, the review panel will evaluate your work in light of the objectives given above.

6.7 Interview – Rationale

The review panel provides you with an opportunity to engage in a professional dialogue concerning theoretical and clinical issues examined in your paper, and to show your thinking along the lines indicated in the objectives.

6.8 Interview

Having read your paper, members of the review panel meet for up to 30 minutes prior to the interview and immediately afterwards in order to formulate a recommendation regarding both the paper and the interview. The interview will normally last between 45 and 60 minutes.

6.9 Objectives

The panel addresses areas as required and aims to:

– ensure you can expand on key themes and further explore case material where required;

– elucidate any unclear clinical and/or theoretical aspects of the paper;

– take up significant aspects relevant to the case or themes that appear to have been omitted or have received insufficient attention;

– ascertain your ability to engage professionally and reflectively in clinical and theoretical discussion;

– give you an opportunity to demonstrate a capacity for clinical and theoretical reflection beyond that which may be shown in your paper.

Following the interview, the review panel will submit a written report, agreed to by all its members, including the external assessor, to the training committee. The report will include a summary of the pre- and post-interview discussion, and will reflect the views of the panel and their recommendation.

 

If the panel does not recommend the paper be passed, the report will include suggestions for rewriting or re-submitting the paper. The review panel is not authorised to inform you of any recommendation following the interview, as this is the responsibility of the training committee.

After a final paper has been passed, a copy of the paper should be sent to the AJA office.

 

C 7 ACCESS TO THE CLINICAL PAPER ARCHIVE

Members or candidates wishing to have access to final clinical papers, please note: papers are available to read on the AJA premises only. They may not be taken away or photocopied, to maintain confidentiality in respect of clinical material. To access papers, contact the office administrator to agree a time. Normally the office is open on Wednesdays and Thursdays, between 10.30 a.m. and 5.00 p.m. but please make an appointment for a specific time.

 

C8 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE & PSYCHIATRIC PLACEMENT

You are expected to have acquired appropriate clinical and psychiatric experience before you see training patients for analysis. Ideally, you have completed these requirements (or their equivalent) before applying. It is also possible to acquire experience after acceptance for training.

The requirements are:

8.1 Clinical experience

You are expected to have an established clinical practice, whether working privately or within an organization, and to have completed at least a minimum of one year’s supervised work with at least two individual patients, seen for counselling / psychotherapy. You may be asked to obtain reports from your supervisors for the training committee.

8.2 Psychiatric placement

You have completed a placement of a minimum of six months at a minimum of half a day a week, ideally on an acute psychiatric ward. The aims are:

– to gain first-hand knowledge of serious psychopathology through direct contact with patients. If possible, some therapeutic work with individuals is recommended;

– to acquire knowledge of current thinking in psychiatry;

– to hear debate about courses of treatment for patients, including discussion about medication. Attendance at ward rounds / case discussions is the best way to obtain this experience.

8.3 Reports

You will be asked to obtain a report from the person responsible for your placement for submission to the Training Committee, on request. You may also be asked to submit a retrospective written account of your experience. Briefly outline the particular nature of the placement, e.g. types of pathology encountered, ward rounds attended, etc. and evaluate the usefulness of this to your own clinical and professional development.

 

C9 TRAINING LOANS

AJA can, in special circumstances, offer candidates an interest free loan to help meet training expenses.

You are asked in selection interviews whether you are aware of the high cost of training, and if you can meet these costs. We assume you can, unless unforeseen situations occur. Applications for a loan are a last resort, once other financial avenues have been explored.

Loans are only given for costs directly related to training. We cannot lend capital sums, bridging loans or for other purposes

 The maximum loan is £5,000 and would usually be paid in instalments. You need to apply in writing to the Chair of the Professional Committee. A senior analyst will then meet with you and make a recommendation to the Treasurer. The fee for this meeting is £75, and you will need to pay this. You will be expected to provide detailed facts about your financial situation to show why a loan is needed and what other financial avenues have been explored. You may be asked to produce bank statements and other financial evidence.

The loan will be agreed and paid to you during the training.  Repayments will commence on completion of the training programme or after a maximum period of 4 years from the original date of the loan agreement. There will be a written and legally binding agreement regarding repayment of the loan, which will be overseen by the Professional Committee and AJA’s accountants.

C10 ACCESS TO CANDIDATE’S FILES (for candidates)

AJA keeps files on all candidates during training. These include copies of your original application, references, seminar leaders’ reports, self-reviews and supervisors’ reports, case studies, relevant points arising from meetings of your review panel, and the training committee; any other correspondence. Files are kept in a locked cabinet in the AJA office. The chair of AJA and office administrator have keys.

You may ask to see your file. Please do so in writing to the chair of the training committee, giving reasons. Asking to see a file is a serious matter. You may be prompted by unconscious processes which may need exploration in your analysis. If there is any possibility this wish might be connected with work with training patients, this can be explored in supervision. In the case of seminar reports, the seminar leader may have discussed their concerns directly. Only when you are sure doing this will really help you, should you make a written request.

Your file is destroyed upon your becoming a member of the Association, or withdrawing from the training.

 

C 11 APPEALS PROCEDURE RELATING TO CANDIDATES

If you wish to appeal against any decision to delay, suspend or terminate your training, you are asked to give written notice to the chair of the Association within two weeks of the date of the letter informing you of this. Please put in writing detailed grounds on which your appeal is based.

The Chair of the Association appoints an appeal assessor, a supervisor not directly involved with your or your review panel, to whom your submission, together with other relevant documents, is sent. After studying the documents they may make one of two recommendations:

– there are no grounds for the appeal. This is final;

– there are grounds for the appeal.

In the event of there being grounds for appeal, the appeal assessor may ask to see you, and / or one or both of your supervisors, and / or the chair of your review panel. After these interviews they may recommend either the appeal be upheld or the appeal be rejected. This is final. The appeal assessor writes a short report in confidence to the chair of the Association outlining the reasons for the outcome. This is shared with the chair of the training committee. You are informed of the decision by the chair of the Association.

All concerned take care at every stage that the appeal proceedings are conducted in a confidential, sensitive and humanitarian manner in relation to you and any other members involved.

January 2015.

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